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Weapons Charges Archives

New York rapper accused of having weapons in prison

It was reported on July 24 that a New York rapper who was accused of a violent crime involving drugs was facing additional charges for promoting prison contraband after allegedly getting a hold of a knife while he was at Rikers Island. It was believed his girlfriend was involved in providing him with the weapon.

A comparison of weapons charges in New York

Many factors determine the severity of a weapons possession charge. A conviction on a first-degree offense will result in a class B felony on a person's record. Charges in this category arise when someone has a weapon with an explosive substance, according to Penal Code section 265.03. Additionally, the charge requires that the person has an intent to use the weapon in an unlawful manner against people or property. Possession of 10 or more firearms could also bring a first-degree charge.

Charges of illegally possessing a firearm in New York

In the state of New York, the penalties for the illegal possession of a firearm can be quite severe. You may be charged with illegally carrying a gun that is registered, and if it is loaded at the time, you could face having a felony conviction appear on your record. Even if the gun did not have any bullets inside of it at the time, if bullets were within your reach, the law still considers the gun to be a loaded one.

New York pistol license application requirements

Some people make the mistake of assuming that, because they have a right to keep and bear arms, they can freely own and carry pistols. New York law requires that people must apply for and receive a pistol license, however, before a person can own this particular type of gun. Failing to get a license to own a pistol can thus potentially expose a person who has one to criminal charges.

New York teen arrested for false report of a gunman

Police said they arrested an East Meadow teen who allegedly falsely reported the presence of an armed individual to them. The claim made by the 17-year-old was taken by police on April 6 at 7:41 p.m. Police were told that an individual carrying a rifle was walking along the trails in Massapequa's Brady Park. In response to the report of a gunman, the police ordered multiple units into action, including the Bureau of Special Operations, members of the Seventh Precinct and an air operations unit. After conducting a search for around 45 minutes, the police called it off.

No serial numbers on many weapons seized in police raid

Assault rifles and handguns along with over 10,000 rounds of ammunition were found in the home of a convicted sex offender in Cato, New York. A raid was conducted on the 34-year-old man's home in Cayuga County by State police after investigators obtained a search warrant.

New York aggravated assault charges

An aggravated assault is similar to a simple assault, but it involves some factor that increases its severity from a misdemeanor to a felony. For instance, serious injuries can result in aggravated assault charges. This includes life-threatening injuries or injuries that disfigure or maim the victim. It could even include cases where the assailant made the victim fear serious injuries, whether the victim received any injuries or not.

First-degree murder penalties

New York law categorizes murder as one of the most serious crimes a person can commit. In accordance with this stance, the punishments for first-degree murder are among the most strict that can be handed down by the court. Not all first-degree murder cases are handled in the same way, and not all of these cases may result in identical sentences. The actual circumstances of each particular case can have a profound impact on the way that the sentence is carried out.

Weapon laws in New York

New York residents may benefit from learning more about the state laws prohibiting the use of dangerous weapons as described in Section 265.35. People caught using a dangerous weapon to hunt within city limits may be charged with a class-A misdemeanor. Several other scenarios described in the section could lead to someone receiving a class-A misdemeanor for a weapons offense.